Pass-pour pt.3

My brain hasn’t been in writing mode recently, perhaps in part because I’ve been focused on the search for a new car. I finally bought one yesterday, another Hyundai Accent, a little newer (2011 instead of 2007). It has a sunroof, a working CD player, and an auxiliary cable so I could use an iPod if I wanted. We’ll see how it goes, but I feel like I got a good deal. I’m mostly glad the car buying process is over, it’s a real pain in the arse.

After driving a bigger car (a rental, 2021 Hyundai Kona) I’m thankful to be getting into the spacious subcompact class again. When driving around this city, it’s nice to be small and maneuverable, especially when you’re looking for trash. I plan on getting a roof rack, so that I can maybe stash a bit of extra junk up there if necessary. But more often than not, I focus on smaller things and rarely wish I had more space.

This spot provided gold cufflinks and that 1000$ Lusitania nutcracker late last year. I didn’t see much after that, however. One day I picked up a nice 1950s CCM bike which was an easy sell, and then there was this little haul.

It was someone’s old collection of flag, pennants and patches, some of which seem to date back to WWII. Those CFB Trenton pennants are pretty cool and generally do well on eBay. The little flags are the bottom left look Scottish; this guy seems to have been a proud Scot. According to this obituary from 1969 (there’s not a heck of a lot of information out there otherwise), Camp Laclouwhi operated near Joliette, QC until 1952 after which it was bought by Scouts Canada and became Camp Jackson Dodds.

I suspect some of these patches date back to the war. If anyone knows a bit of their history, please share your wisdom in the comments! Some cool designs regardless.

And finally, my most striking find was this small Nazi pennant, which I’d guess was made to go on a car. I’d guess that this fella, who seemed to have had an interest in history, got it from someone who served overseas. I can understand why someone might want to throw this out, but I’m a “those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it” kinda guy.

Regardless, a week or two after this haul I saw an ad for an estate sale at this location. I wish I could have gone, as there was probably a lot of interesting stuff, but I think it was my last chance for garage sales that same weekend (this was in October I believe). All in all, a lot of stuff got tossed that could have easily made some extra money at the sale, but sometimes families do some sorting themselves before calling on the experts. After all, there’s always some “old junk” kicking around that surely no one will buy! Or, they try to deal with the things themselves, then get overwhelmed and call a liquidator.

Here & there

Here’s a few finds from miscellaneous, short-lived destinations. This spot was cool for a week, but I didn’t pick up much after that.

It seemed like a Scot lived here. These are sporrans, part of the traditional Scottish attire. Apparently the horsehair ones are typically used by pipers & drummers, and the smaller one is a more formal dress sporran. I’d guess they dated to the 60s or so, and I sold the lot on eBay for 150$.

I also found a lot of Boys’ Brigade stuff, including a nice leather sash with a matching pouch. I’m not super familiar with the Boys’ Brigade, though they seem to be similar to the Boy Scouts. I have someone who wants to buy the collection, but we haven’t figured out a price yet.

Otherwise, it seemed like someone had a love for music. I found a cover of an old music book, probably from someone’s childhood, and a grand piano jewelry box made in Occupied Japan. I also picked up four sweaters from a Montreal barbershop group. My only other find of note was a non-functional Wittnauer watch, which I sold quickly on eBay for 65$.

I got pretty excited about one particular spot in TMR, but I think I was late to the party because after two weeks of decent trash the gutting (renovation) of the house began. That was a bit disappointing. Anyways, I saved some neat ephemera, including an old bus transfer, a very vintage bookmark, and a framed picture of King George. I grouped that Santa tin with a different Santa tin I had from the same era and sold them on eBay for 100$, though currently they’re lost in the mail…

My best find though was an antique Waterman Ideal fountain pen in sterling silver, which was part of a small collection mostly featuring promotional pens. Dating to somewhere around the 1920s, these pens seem to sell for around 200$ Canadian, give or take. I might just do an auction for this one and let the market figure it out.

Finally, a spot in NDG excited me after a fun first week, but was mostly disappointing after that. Excluding some copper pots I didn’t include in the shot, this was the creme de la creme. That copper thing in the middle is a bit of a mystery to me, it’s marked “URYEA” (or something close to that, I don’t have it with me right now) but that doesn’t ring any bells on Google. I also like that little lidded sugar bowl (?), the frog planter, and the salt & pepper shakers, the latter of which were made in Japan. But two things stuck out to me the most.

First, this really old thermometer made by Charles Wilder of Peterborough, NH. It was likely made in the late 1800s, given that apparently Wilder died in 1900 (though the company continue on briefly). I like how it has “blood heat” and “sumr heat [sic]” etched on the side in that very old-timey way. Some of his stuff seems to go for decent money, though I’m not sure what this particular model sells for. If you have a Worthpoint account maybe you can tell me! Aside from it being cool, it also contains mercury which isn’t something you should be casually throwing out.

Lastly, that pouch in the front contained a small collection of coins. There are a few pre-Canadian Newfoundland coins here, including a couple of silver 5-cent pieces (which were quite small). I also like the big cents and the Philadelphia transit token. The oldest coin is near the bottom left, it’s an 1843 US 1-cent piece. I’d say it’s in pretty good condition, and probably worth at least 30$. Check out similar coins on eBay for a better look at the coin design.

I still haven’t shown you some of my bests finds of the year yet… I tend to like to wait a while before making those public. However, I think I’ve waited long enough, so expect to see one of them in my next post.

Rich people moving: Exhibit B

This spot was productive between August & October of last year. As with the last “rich people moving” post, I was too busy to take many pictures at the time so I’ll largely be showing you the best of the best. It started off with housewares, silverware, and a bag full of candles. That peaked my interest, and I made a note to return in the coming weeks.

On my second stop I found a ziplock bag full of jewelry, and saved a few more pieces that were loose in the bag.

As I’ve been saying, I was pretty lucky finding jewelry this year! A lot of this stuff was junky, but as you know I’m often able to save something decent from these collections, and this particular batch was pretty solid overall.

Here’s the best of the bunch as per usual. Here we have a Pippo Perez stainless steel watch featuring several small diamonds. It seems to retail for around 700$, and I list listed mine on eBay for 250$ (sans strap, which was worn out). Otherwise, we have a couple Michael Negrin pieces, a silver Birks brush, a silver chain, and a bit of scrimshaw.

I found another ziplock bag full of sunglasses here, the nicest probably being the pair up top, which if I remember right were Gucci. There were also maybe 4-5 different House of Harlow (Nicole Ritchie’s brand) sunglasses that did fairly well at the auction.

There were several big gaudy rings in the style of those at the top left & silver, a few of which claimed to be silver but were not. These ones were real. As for gold, we have a solo 10k earring, a pair of 14k earrings with big, clear violet-coloured stones (lighter than they appear in this photo), and a 14k white gold ring with plenty of little clear, pink, and black diamonds (confirmed as such using my tester). All in all there’s probably about a grand of potential profit right here!

(FYI that cufflink was stainless steel, apparently it can fool the gold tests and you have to use the platinum acid to deal with it).

I saved lots of nice housewares, doodads, and knickknacks, many of which went straight to a yard sale or to the auction. This geode dish did pretty well at Encans Quebec, if I recall correctly it sold in the 40$ range.

Otherwise, we can finish with this slightly busted but easily fixed bronze piece. It looks really nicely made, but I can’t find a signature anywhere on it.

To fix it you’d just have to weld the pieces back into place, which wouldn’t be hard I don’t think. Anyways, if you have any insights regarding this piece (or any others) please share them in the comments!

Near the end of my time here, some folks maybe 100m down the street started doing their own pre-moving purge. They seem to be done now, but in the end I think they may have topped these guys. You can decide for yourself soon enough.