Bordeaux-Cartierville pt. 2

Here’s some finds from one of my best spots of 2018. It started with lots of quality housewares and silver plated items, most of which went straight to the auction house. You can see a few of those finds below, but I know there was lots more I lost track of.

That brass coffee mill was a nice piece, it was made in Greece and sold for 40$. The tall glass & silver plate pitcher sold for 44$. Silver plated lots like the one at bottom right do pretty well at the local auction, which is good because the individual pieces are rarely worth listing on eBay (due to their size / high shipping costs) and are a pain to get good money for at yard sales.

My most profitable finds came later on, towards the end of the spot’s productive streak. One day I opened up a bag and saw a jewelry box.

The contents looked to have been picked over but there was still plenty of good stuff left for me.

Most of my profit will come from those tie clips at bottom left – both are Italian 18k gold and together they’re worth about 300$ in scrap. You can see the hallmarks in the picture below! All the pieces to the left of the knife are either silver or gold excepting the large penny (the other coin is a silver 50 cent piece). The knife is actually a souvenir Cretan dagger, the blade isn’t particularly well crafted but the sheath is 93.5% silver. I found the exact same one a few years ago in Montreal West and sold it on eBay for 25$. I think I’ll ask for a little bit more this time around.

That bag was great, but this one ended up being more notable. It looked like someone just took a junk drawer and simply dumped the contents inside. There was a lot of crap in there (mostly boring papers), but I could tell that there were some potentially valuable smalls hanging around near the bottom of the bag. I took the whole thing to the car for closer examination.

I found a bunch of stamps, a couple of broken gold chains, and an unusual tobacco pipe with some kind of decorative metal encasement (please share any information you might have about its origins!). However, the most valuable thing pictured is the watch strap.

The buckle was 18k gold and had similar markings to the Patek Philippe buckle I found a few years ago and sold for 650$. This one lacks the “PPd” hallmark, but apparently the “AW” company also did work for other luxury Swiss brands like Vacheron Constantin and Omega. Fortunately for me many hardcore watch collectors seek out only original parts even down to the lowly buckle. As a result, this one sold fairly quickly for 400$.

That bag also held a nearly unbelievable find…

… this wad of cash! American money at that. The stash was held together with a white paper clip and I’d guess the people just didn’t notice it when dumping out the drawer. The found bills totaled 307$, which turned into nearly 400$ when I traded it in at the bank. This is easily my best cash find to date – my previous best was the 140$ I found in the pockets of trashed shirts earlier this year. Before that my record was the 27$ I found way back in 2013. It’s funny how finds like these sometimes happen in bunches.

That wasn’t it for the cash though. I also found an old wallet, inside of which was 21$ in old bills. The folks doing the tossing clearly didn’t possess great attention to detail. The house was sold, so perhaps they were just in a rush. Either way, as you can tell this spot did me quite well! Here’s hoping I keep finding cash in 2019.

Soon enough I’ll share my year in review / top finds of 2018. I was so swamped this summer that a few of my best finds didn’t even make the blog, so you’re bound to be surprised by at least a few things.

Links

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3. Help me pay off student loan debt / Contribute to the blog
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Recent sales: October & November

Instagram

I’ve been making a bit of extra money selling larger finds via Instagram stories. Basically, I post a pic (which stays on my page for 24 hours) and offer same day delivery of the item(s) in question. It’s been a good approach thus far – a lot of my Instagram followers are very local so delivery is easy, and it’s helped keep my storage spaces clear of junk.

Set of four vintage chairs: 70$. I found these in Côte Saint-Luc. I try to price things to sell, while adding a bit extra for my delivery efforts.

Set of four vintage dining chairs: 80$. I picked these up in Cartierville / Nouveau Bordeaux.

I sold a few other things this way, but those were the highlights.

eBay

October – 7 sales for 295$.

November: 13 sales for 1329.75$.

Parker Ingenuity pen: 75$. Found in Westmount.

Sterling silver Parker 75 ballpoint pen: 75$. Found in Cote St-Luc.

Malcolm Campbell high school ring: 40$. The school was located in Cartierville and closed in the mid-80s. A private Armenian school is now in its place. Found in the Mile End.

Montreal Expos 1969 yearbook: 50$. From in the inaugural season. Found in NDG.

Amber necklace: 340$. The one on the left finally sold after spending about two years on eBay. I didn’t know how to price it, so I decided to start high and gradually lower the price. The strategy did eventually work, and the buyer seems to be happy. The one on the right is still available for around the same price, though it seems to be a bit less popular than the one that just sold. Found in the Plateau back in November of 2016.

Tandy 102 portable computer: 115$. A fun piece of computing history! Found in Outremont.

St Laurent oil quart: 355$. As mentioned in a recent post. Found in Nouveau Bordeaux.

Bakelite poker caddy: 120$. Found in CDN.

Expos 1970 pocket schedule: 95$. Also found in CDN.

Auction

Total: 2086$ after fees (156 total lots). I consigned a lot of stuff around this time! The prices stated below don’t take fees into account.

Illum Wikkelso lounge chair: 170$. I’m happy with this. The wood was in good condition, but the cushions were dirty and needed to be replaced. Found in TMR.

Vintage garbage can: 85$. As mentioned in a recent post! Some of you weren’t surprised by the price, but I sure was. It makes sense in retrospect, but I guess I never really thought about how much a trash can might be worth. Found in Cote St-Luc.

Pyrex lot: 65$. This was part of that massive Mile End lab Pyrex haul that I was too busy to take many photos of. Regardless, I’m very happy with how it all did at auction – the realized prices were pretty good and it required very little effort on my part. This is just one of many (perhaps 20?) Pyrex lots that sold.

“Gab” by MC Thomas: 55$. One thing that I love about the auction house is that I’m occasionally able to make decent money from random art. I found no information about this artist online, but at least two people appreciated its spacey look. Found in TMR.

Pyrex Vision lot: 26$. Not bad. Found in the Mile End.

Lot of four Normand Hudon signed lithographs: 70$. Hudon was a noted Quebec cartoonist and caricaturist. These came from an interesting summer spot in TMR, unfortunately I was too busy at the time to document what I found there.

Pioneer Laserdisc player, tested & working: 46$. I don’t remember where I found this, but I do remember it sitting around in my garage for months before I finally made time to test it.

Chrome floor lamp: 80$. I picked this up while driving around Rosemont with a roommate. It was a casual run (ie: I wasn’t expecting much) but I ended up making about 75$ from two auction-able finds (this lamp, and a vintage trunk).

Total: 3860.75$, 24126.50$ so far in 2018. I’ll share my December sales and recap the year pretty soon!

White Owl

Let’s go back a couple of months to this pile I happened upon in Cote-des-Neiges. I met a woman involved in the tossing and she told me they were clearing out an apartment that had been empty for years.

A lot of the stuff in there was pretty old. I found a few interesting radios, including these little transistors. The Sharp sold for 13$ at eBay auction, which was a bit disappointing as I know I could have gotten more using a set price. The market for some transistor radios is pretty good overall, but I guess there’s a lot of models to choose from, thus making an auction for any individual radio a bit risky (unless it’s one of the most collectible models of course). I added the Zenith to a portable radio lot that did well at the local auction house.

This old Candle 12 Transistor is pretty neat. It works, though the controls are very quirky. I’ll likely bring it to the local auction once their vacations are over.

This portable tube radio is definitely the oldest of the bunch – it probably dates to the early 1930s (“Patented 1916-1932 inclusive”). It was made by General Electric, but the exact model number was erased by the rust. It was probably high tech for its time!

I couldn’t find anything quite like it online, so if you happen to recognize it please let me know! To view a close-up of the photos below, scroll to the bottom of the screen and click “view full-size.”

 

A few of these pictures aren’t great, but at some point I figured crappy photos were better than none at all. I still have to replace the photography umbrella bulbs that were stolen during that crazy yard sale, and it’s harder to take photos outside in the winter. Anyways, this is a beautiful mid-century portable record player made by Philips. It didn’t work at all, but still sold for 44$ at the local auction. It’s very much in style at the moment.

The eBay auction result for this VW beetle was also disappointing, perhaps for the same reason as the transistor radio. It didn’t help though that I misspelt “Volkswagen” and forgot to add the VW keyword. Oh well! I guess another good thing about Buy It Now listings is that they give you more time to fix your mistakes – eBay doesn’t let you change much once an auction starts, and they don’t like you cancelling auctions that have bids on them.

This Tri-Ang electric Jaguar seems to be worth around 30$, though I’ll probably use it to sweeten to future toy car lot at the local auction house.

This awesome poker chip caddy was made from solid Bakelite, which was the first plastic made from synthetic compounds. It was very popular from the 1920s to early 1940s, and is now pretty collectible due to its solid nature and excellent color. This piece sold pretty quickly on eBay for 120$ + shipping.

This Parker 75 “ciselé” ballpoint pen & mechanical pencil set was also pretty collectible. The pair sold pretty quickly for 150$ + shipping.

I also saved a stash of Canadian Tire money, which looks more impressive than it is (I’d guess there’s about 3$ in there) …

… a collection of 8×10″ racetrack photos (there were four in total, and they’ll soon be listed at the auction house);

… a receipt from 1920 (one can only wonder why the previous owner thought this was worth framing!);

… a vintage fan;

… and some miscellaneous junk. The clock goes with the marble pen holder, it just needs to be glued back on. I’ve never found smelling salts before, and wouldn’t have expected them to have been made by a traditional perfumer like Yardley.

This spot was most notable for providing neat old junk boxes, most of which once held cigars.

One held some less interesting papers, as well as several pennies and a well worn 18k gold ring.

Another held old business cards, some old stamps, and a silver dime. I’ve found a lot of vintage business cards recently, many of which were made for establishments that once did business not far from my home. I’m thinking it might be fun to walk around and match the business with the building, taking a picture of both and sharing them on Instagram. Could be a good excuse to get out of the house at least! What do you think?

This box held the most valuable item of the bunch.

Inside was a collection of interesting paper ephemera, including this dollar bill and a bunch of old bus tickets.

There were a few old photos inside, most of which featured this dog.

Most of the papers were sports-related, however. Here’s some old horse-racing tickets & schedules …

… some Canadians & Alouettes schedules;

… a bunch of tickets stubs, mostly from minor hockey and Expos games;

… and a collection of Expos schedules. Most of these weren’t worth much, with the exception being the 1970 Expos schedule at bottom right. It was made for the 1970 season, the 2nd of the Expos, and appears to be fairly uncommon. I listed it at 95$ and it sold very quickly – perhaps I could have gotten more for it, but oh well.

This spot didn’t produce for very long, but my finds here still netted me at least 500$. Not bad! However, in my next post I’ll share some junk from an even more profitable pile.

Links

1. Facebook page
2. My eBay listings, Sign up for eBay, Search for something you want / research something you have (I’m a member of the eBay Partner Network so I make a bit of money if you buy things [even if they’re not mine] or sign up for an account via these links)
3. Help me pay off student loan debt / Contribute to the blog
4. Follow me on Instagram